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  1. #1
    Master mettle's Avatar
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    Lightbulb who has a 'tactical 10-22' for carbine training

    That's right, you read it correctly. I have been thinking, wondering, pondering...

    who has a 10-22 with a Christie Stock? Would it be a viable 'carbine course' gun to learn the basic mechanics or carbine'ing CQB stuff etc?

    It just occured to me that I put 'Tech Sights' on my 10-22 for the Appleseeds I've been to, have run the gun a LOT with those sights and 3 position shooting; BUT, could I put a 'tactical' stock on it, a serious reddot to simulate real'ness and learn good carbine stuff with it?

    Any thoughts on this... please advise. In the weird economic times now, and rest assured, will continue on until 10' at least .22Lr will be gold.

    Anyone does this? Is it viable?

  2. #2
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar
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    I put a TAPCO stock on mine. Simiiar to the Christie, but lighter, less expensive (about $80), and I can make the stock shorter than the Christie's minimum length.

    If you want to make it as much like an AR as possible, then you want something like the Nordic Components chasis and the additional required AR furniture.
    http://www.cactustactical.com/osc/nordic-components-ruger-ar22-receiver-stock-kit-p-1383.html
    Email: Joseph@AdaptiveConsultingandTraining.com


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  3. #3
    Patriot, Pater, Plinker obijohn's Avatar
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    Rhino's setup is a great training tool. the nordic setup will more closely replicate the feel of your ar, but they are a bit expensive. would a dedicated .22 upper be advised? yes, but on a budget, the tapco approach is close enough. i'll be doing up a tapco setup like rhino's after christmas.
    and yes, it would be a very valuable training tool. you will still need trigger time with the .556 ar, but the .22 will allow you to train for pennies instead of dollars.
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    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
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  4. #4
    Master mettle's Avatar
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    how would I get as close as possible to length of pull, front hand placement etc. with the Tapco setup? Is it close enough to be considered an aid to training or just a simulation?

  5. #5
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar
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    The TAPCO stock is virtually identical to an M4 stock, so you can adjust it to whatever length you like. The fore end had molded picatinny rail on the bottom, so you can install a foregrip if you so choose.

    The big difference is the weight.
    Email: Joseph@AdaptiveConsultingandTraining.com


    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
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    Article 1 - Bill of Rights - Section 32

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    To prevail you must ACT!

  6. #6
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    shooter521's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mettle View Post
    who has a 10-22 with a Christie Stock? Would it be a viable 'carbine course' gun to learn the basic mechanics or carbine'ing CQB stuff etc?
    You can practice the fundamentals with a 10/22, but that's about it. Once you graduate to a centerfire platform, you'll have to learn a whole new manual of arms (unless your centerfire platform is a Mini-14). If you can start out with a .22 version of your chosen platform (i.e. WASR-22 for AKs, or dedicated upper or .22 conversion kit for ARs), you'll be better off in the long run. Not only will you be able to learn the correct manual of arms from the get-go, but you can continue to use the .22 for sustainment training indefinitely.

    I have a 10/22 with an M4 stock adapter (predates both the Christie's and Tapco offerings) and a red-dot sight, but it's pretty much just a suppressor host; my Ciener .22 conversion kit for the ARs serves in the training role.



  7. #7
    Master mettle's Avatar
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    well, I own a RA xcr so the .22lr kit is a no-go. After seeing a lot of the options for different things, I think I am going to go with a Tapco or Christie so I can really get good with the irons. Incidently, when I dial down the xcr, it does not kick much more than a .22mag, so in a way I am really close to rifle feedback in a .22lr. Which is a good thing. Thanks for all the imput guys. Got me thinking alone the lines I needed.

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